Regards – Pablo Garrigos Cucarella

Écrit par sur 21 janvier 2021

Dans cette émission de Regard, nous accueillons Pablo Garrigos Cucarella, journaliste visuel basé à Bruxelles.

Pablo Garrigos Cucarella commence son parcours par des études de journalisme à l’université de Valence. Il poursuit avec un diplôme de photographie à l’école supérieure d’art et de design de la même ville.

Pablo Garrigos a un parcours très diversifié et mène notamment de nombreux travaux au long cours qui traitent des thématiques des droits humains et des identités.

Il a aussi couvert plusieurs conflits, notamment au Haut-Karabakh et au Congo.

Son travail a été récompensé à de nombreuses reprises, et il est publié dans des journaux nationaux à travers toute l’Europe tels que El Pais, The Guardian ou encore Le soir.

Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, May 2017. A child pulls out the curtain of the national theatre before the start of a classical play. The theatre is played now in the Youth center and is used to entertain civil society and the army, but also as a tool to transmit values of the national identity. This story is about a fight between dreams and reality. The fight of some young Armenians born during war (1988-1994) that against all odds have decided to come back to their motherland Nagorno-Karabakh Republic (NKR) to build a future for them and their country and find a solution in a context of post military conflict, poverty, no jobs and no opportunities. Credit : Pablo Garrigós
Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, January 2018. Mikael Hakobian, 15 years old, has decided to start his military career from high school. He comes from a family of soldiers and he want to became one like his father. The post-conflict still imbues pretty much everything. This story is about a fight between dreams and reality. The fight of some young Armenians born during war (1988-1994) that against all odds have decided to come back to their motherland Nagorno-Karabakh Republic (NKR) to build a future for them and their country and find a solution in a context of post military conflict, poverty, no jobs and no opportunities. Credit : Pablo Garrigos
Belgium, Brussels, October 2018 Supporters and friends cheer Salma before the fight in Molenbeek. The Brussels Boxing Academy (BBA) uses boxing as a means to social inclusion. It fights against marginality and reinforces the self-esteem of young people from neighbourhoods of Brussels such as Molenbeek, Anneessens or Anderlecht. Selma, a Belgian young girl of Moroccan origin, is the fruit of this social fight. Following the terrorist attacks in Brussels, and in order to fight against the image of “cradle of international jihadism”, the Belgian authorities opted for heavy-handed policies to be implemented in in working-class neighbourhoods of the city (e.g.Molenbeek, Anneessens or Anderlecht). They increased the police presence, conducted raids on sports and social clubs such as the BBA and used violence against groups of adolescents in these areas. On the contrary, nothing was made to solve the underlying problems that affect these communities (high unemployment rate, lack of opportunities and institutional abandonment) and that encouraged several young people to travel to Syria in a process of radicalization. The BBA has been a vivid portrait of this issue. In response to this situation, the club promotes the “vivre-ensemble” (social coexistence) through the respect, self-confidence, tolerance and discipline that inculcates to young people like Selma.
Far from the cameras, a humanitarian crisis is affecting the southern part of DRC’s North Kivu province (in the East of the country), with almost nobody helping or doing something on the ground to change the situation. For years, the territories of Masisi, Walikale and Rutshuru have been plagued with armed violence and banditry. In the past months, these armed clashes have intensified, further aggravating the dire humanitarian situation, leading to significant numbers of displaced people and worrying signs of malnutrition, sexual violence and gunshot wounds among them. More than 687,500 displaced people now live in camps, which are at limit, or are hosted by local families. Despite this critical situation, these territories – often referred to as the ‘Little North’ of North Kivu – suffer from a glaring lack of assistance from most of the humanitarian organizations and political actors due to insecurity, difficulties in movement around the region, and a lack of funding. They literally abandoned. MSF is one of the few working on the field and had treated more than 11,220 malnourished children, 2,310 victims of sexual violence and 1,980 people with weapons injuries from January to September 2019.

Présentation : Ulrich Huygevelde


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